057: Grit & Resilience: Teaching Kids with ADHD How to Overcome Obstacles, with Natalie Borrell & Alison Grant

Picture of hosted by Penny Williams

hosted by Penny Williams

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In this episode, I’m talking with coaches Natalie Borrell and Alison Grant of Life Success for Teens. We discuss how to help kids with ADHD address and overcome challenges and obstacles. Learn how to help your kids build grit and resistance — the core aspects of being able to overcome challenges without falling apart or avoiding obstacles.

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My Guest

NATALIE BORRELL & ALISON GRANT

Natalie Borrell is the Founder of Life Success for Teens. She coached high school and competitive cheerleading for 8 years and this is where she realized that she had a gift for connecting with teenagers and motivating them to be the best version of themselves. She has 11 years of experience working as a school psychologist in a public high school. Her areas of expertise include working with students who have ADHD, executive functioning weaknesses, and other learning differences.

Natalie earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Ohio State University in 2004, her masters degree in school psychology in 2006 from Michigan State University, and her Educational Specialist Degree in 2007 from Kent State University. She became a certified Academic Life Coach in 2015 and founded Life Success For Teens in 2016. When she is not coaching students, Natalie can be found traveling with her family, reading cookbooks, or binge-watching episodes of Friends. One of her favorite part of coaching is getting a text or email from her former students.

Alison Grant joined the LSFT team with 15 years as a Family Consumer Science teacher at Willoughby South High School. As a teacher, Alison has advised groups including Student Council, Teen Institute and Class Officers. Alison has coached dance, cheer, and tennis and in 2011 was named Adele Knight Teacher of the Year. In recent years, she has been part of an initiative to develop a mentoring program that assists freshmen in the transition from middle school to high school. Alison earned her Academic Life Coach certificate in 2017 which allowed her to help students realized they can be successful inside and outside the classroom. Her favorite part of coaching is watching a student have a moment when everything clicks and their hard work has paid off!

Alison earned her bachelor’s degree in vocational education from Kent State University in 2003 and her master’s degree in educational administration from Ursuline College as well as a masters in school counseling from John Carroll University. Alison lives in Willoughby, OH with her husband and two daughters Maggie and Gwyneth. When she is not spending time with her family, Alison enjoys crafting and taking snapshots of her family’s adventures!

 

Thank you!

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Hello!
I'm Penny Williams.

I help stuck and struggling parents (educators, too) make the pivots necessary to unlock success and joy for neurodivergent kids and teens, themselves, and their families. I'm honored to be part of your journey!

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Quick Start: 3 High-Impact Actions to Transform Behavior

Transforming negative or unwanted behavior is a long and complex process. HOWEVER, there are a few actions you can take right now that will provide a big impact. These 3 high-impact strategies address foundational aspects of behavior, empowering you to help your child feel better so they can do better.

SOME OF MY FAVORITE TOOLS

1

Makes time visual for those with time blindness.

2

Blends gaming with off-screen activities to teach coping skills through play.

3

Manage chores and routines while building self-confidence and independence.

4

A chair that gives kids a sensory hug.

About the show...

I'm your host, Penny.

Join me as I help parents, caregivers, and educators like you harness the realization that we are all beautifully complex and marvelously imperfect. Each week I deliver insights and actionable strategies on parenting neurodivergent kids — those with ADHD, autism, anxiety, learning disabilities…

My approach to decoding behavior while honoring neurodiversity and parenting the individual child you have will provide you with the tools to help you understand and transform behavior, reduce your own stress, increase parenting confidence, and create the joyful family life you crave. I am honored to have helped thousands of families worldwide to help their kids feel good so they can do good.

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2 Comments
  • Hi! I love these podcasts! I have a 25 year old daughter who I think may have mild ADHD. She’s one of those kids that always struggled for average and slipped through the cracks of school. I have terrible mom guilt cause I’m just now seeing this. She is currently working on getting her degree in early childhood education and its been a long and bumpy road. Any advice to help her make things less of a struggle? Thanks!

    • I would recommend that she connect with the disability services office at her college/university and see how they can support her and help her succeed. An ADHD Coach could really help as well. There are many great coaches, like Jeff Copper and John Tucker, to name a couple I know.

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