On this episode of the Parenting ADHD Podcast, I talk with Sarah Wayland, PhD, a Consultant and Special Needs Care Navigator, of Guiding Exceptional Parents. Sarah and I have known each other for several years, after meeting at the Happy Mama Retreat. She truly understands kids with ADHD and autism and always offers great insights in informed and compassionate parenting.

My favorite topic to turn to Sarah about is the idea that “behavior is communication.” She and I are both huge fans of Ross Greene’s work, where he outlines this concept and much more.

This is Part 2 of a 4-part series on behavior as communication that I’m doing with Sarah on the podcast. I’m super excited about it! Part 1 was episode 003: What Your Child’s Behavior is Actually Telling You. If you haven’t listened to it yet, you definitely should, but you don’t have to listen to it before this episode.

On this show, Sarah and I discuss why kids with ADHD get angry, and what parents can do about it. We discuss emotions, developmental age/delay, meeting your child where they are, and handling big emotions and intense kids. There are a lot of really powerful insights on behavior, deciphering what it really means, and having a positive affect on it going forward.

Enjoy!

 

Resources in this Episode

(Yes, some of these are affiliate links.)

50 Insightful Reasons for Troublesome Behavior in Kids with Autism (and ADHD) — the chart that Sarah made describing the behavior you see and what is likely going on under the surface. Free download of this chart too.

Ross Greene: http://www.livesinthebalance.org and The Explosive Child

Ross Greene’s ALSUP to identify problem areas and lagging skills: http://www.livesinthebalance.org/sites/default/files/ALSUP216.pdf.

More on meeting your kids where they are from Sarah’s website

Resources to teach self-regulation skills and emotional awareness: Zones of Regulation (http://www.zonesofregulation.com/index.html) , Incredible 5-Point Scale (https://www.5pointscale.com/)

Dealing Constructively with Big Emotions in the moment:

  • Show Empathy
  • Stop talking
  • Address the emotions, not the words

 

My Guest

After a long career as research psychologist studying spoken language, Sarah Wayland, PhD, became a Special Needs Care Navigator with the goal of ensuring that no parent ever felt as lost and confused as she and her husband did when embarking on their journey as parents of two exceptional children with special needs.

Nothing gives her more joy than teaching parents about effective strategies for raising their challenging children, and working with individual clients as an RDI consultant. Sarah works to give other families what RDI and parenting classes gave her family: Hope.

In addition to teaching and working with individual clients, Sarah is co-editor of the book – Technology Tools for Students with Autism, and has written articles for the 2e Newsletter, Washington Parent Magazine, the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum, and Expert Beacon. You can learn more and connect with Sarah at www.guidingexceptionalparents.com.

 

Thanks for joining me!Parenting ADHD Podcast 013: Why Your Child Gets Angry, and What You Can Do About It

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Penny Williams
Author. Parenting Guide. Journalist. Speaker.
Penny Williams guides and mentors parents raising kids with ADHD and/or autism. She’s the parent of a son with ADHD and autism, and the author of three award-winning books on parenting kids with ADHD. Penny is the current editor of ParentingADHDandAutism.com, Founder and Instructor for The Parenting ADHD & Autism Academy, and a frequent contributor on parenting and children with ADHD for ADDitude Magazine and other parenting and special needs publications.